Reader Comments

Hackers exploit coronavirus by creating hundreds of fake websites

by Brett Lohman (2020-05-24)


While the coronavirus spreads across the globe, hackers are taking advantage of the epidemic to steal data and make a profit. 

Cybersecurity experts reveal that since January more than 4,000 coronavirus-related domains have been registered and some 300 are deemed 'malicious' or 'suspicious'.

A new report, released by Check Point, found that domains about the virus are 50 percent more likely to be owned by cybercriminals than other domains registered during the same time period.

Omer Dembinksy, security researcher at Check Point, told DailyMail.com that fraudulent sites offering information or test kits in order to gather people's information or receive payment.

Scroll down for video 






While the coronavirus spreads across the globe, hackers are taking advantage of the pandemic to steal data and money from the public. Cybersecurity experts reveal that since January more than 4,000 coronavirus-related domains have been registered and some 300 are deemed 'malicious' or 'suspicious'


'There is going to be a big increase in malicious coronavirus-themed websites over the next few months, but they will begin to slow as time goes on, Dembinksy told DailyMail.com in an interview.

'We found that the current malicious domains are asking users fill out details or provide payment.'






RELATED ARTICLES


Previous

1

Next




New body armor sensors detect if US soldiers have been... Apple Store employees are warned about a shortage of...




Share this article

Share



'Hackers are also sending emails prompting users to download a file claiming to offer more information about the virus, which gives them access to the user's computer.' 

The coronavirus from Wuhan is one which has never been seen before this outbreak. It has been named SARS-CoV-2 by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. 

The name stands for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2.






Check Point discovered a range of malicious websites using people's fears in order to benefit themselves. One in particular claims to be selling 'the best and fastest test for Coronavirus detection at the fantastic price of 19,000 Russian rubles (about US$300) 







Other web







The firm also discovered a phishing campaign floating around the web in Italy where more than 3,000 cases of coronavirus have been reported and a total of 107 have died. The attack was found to hit over 10 percent of all organizations in Italy


Experts say the bug, which has killed around one in 50 patients since the outbreak began in December, is a 'sister' of the SARS illness which hit China in 2002, so has been named after it.

The disease that the virus causes has been named COVID-19, which stands for coronavirus disease 2019.

To date, there are more than 97,000 cases and 3,000 deaths reported across the globe.

Check Point discovered a range of malicious websites using people's fears in order to benefit themselves.

One in particular claims to be selling 'the best and fastest test for Coronavirus detection at the fantastic price of 19,000 Russian rubles (about US$300).'

'When looking at websites, we need to use common sense,' Dembinksy said.

'If the website is offering something that seems too good to be true or asking you to fill out details about yourself or payments, then it is most likely owned by hackers.'

'Websites that provide information are usually running mining activity in the background and can take control of your computer when you download a file.'

'As a precaution, do not visit websites you are not familiar with.'

'When you do a search for coronavirus, the first few results are usually well trusted.'






The coronavirus from Wuhan is one which has never been seen before this outbreak. It has been named SARS-CoV-2 by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. To date, there are more than 97 cases and 3,000 deaths reported across the globe


The firm also discovered a phishing campaign floating around the web in Italy where more than 3,000 cases of coronavirus have been reported and a total of 107 have died.

The attack was found to hit over 10 percent of all organizations in Italy, which exploited people's fears about coronavirus gain access and mine people's computers.

The email contained a malicious document file, named f###########.doc (#=digit) and with the email subject 'Coronavirus: Informazioni importanti su precauzioni' (English translation- Coronavirus: Important information about precautions).

The body of the email reads: 'Due to the number of cases of coronavirus infection that have been documented in your area, the World Health Organization has prepared a document that includes all the necessary precautions against coronavirus infection.'

To make it seem more legitimate, hackers signed it using a name of a doctor from World Health Organization (WHO) based in Italy.

'We did a search online and could not find a doctor by the name of Penelope Marchetti with WHO or Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanità (OMS),' Check Point explained in the paper.

'Also, the senders' email addresses are not from official WHO or OMS domains, and most of them were not Italian at all.'

The fraudulent document contains a Trojan-Downloader that attacks the user's computer and enables hackers to mine it for data.

Dembinksy explained that he and the team at Check Point monitor the internet during big events, such as holidays, disasters and outbreaks, to see where the traffic is going in order to spot these online threats.

'If there is an Olympics this year, you will some more malicious websites and phishing emails begin to pop-up based on the event.'

'I have seen the same happen during the ash cloud in Iceland and during tsunami warnings.'

'Hackers utilize people's fears for their benefit.'

Here's more information in regards to sex downloads have a look at the website.